Thursday, October 28, 2010

Siam Trading Guide to Urea: Part 3

Now that the epic saga of Urea has reached its pseudo finale, it's time to get down and dirty to figure out how to spread Urea.

Do you need to acquire large quantities of urea? Siam Trading, can arrange this with our partners, the Sutlet Group.

Spreading of Urea

Urea can be bulk-spread, either alone or blended with most other fertilizers. It is recommended that the spreading width not exceed 50 feet when combined with other fertilizer materials. Urea often has a lower density than other fertilizers with which it is blended. This lack of "weight" produces a shorter "distance-of-throw" when the fertilizer is applied with spinner-type equipment. In extreme cases this will result in uneven crop growth and "wavy" or "streaky" fields.

Blending Urea with Other Fertilizers


Urea and fertilizers containing urea can be blended quite readily with monoammonium phosphate (11-52-0) or diammonium phosphate (18-46-0). Urea should not be blended with superphosphates unless applied shortly after mixing. Urea will react with superphosphates, releasing water molecules and resulting in a damp material which is difficult to store and apply.

Application of Urea to Growing Crops

Urea can be applied to sod crops, winter wheat. or other small grains. This application, however, should be made during cool seasons. During warm periods (60 degrees F or above), urea in contact with vegetative material will tend to give off ammonia. If urea must be applied on grass pastures in the summer, apply when there is a high probability of rainfall.

Foliar Application of Urea

Urea can also be applied as a foliar spray on some crops, such as potatoes, wheat, vegetables, and soybeans. Urea is highly watersoluble. At normal atmospheric temperatures, approximately 1 lb. Of urea can be dissolved in 1 lb. of water. Research data indicate that urea should contain no more than 0.25% biuret for use in foliar sprays. For many crops the quantity of nitrogen applied at one time should not exceed 20 lb. of nitrogen per acre.

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